Weather

Alaska’s climate is predominantly cool and wet. Spend a week or two in the Alaskan bush in the summer and you’re likely to see a variety of weather conditions, from sunshine to misting rain to drenching downpours. Good quality rain gear is essential.

Temperatures from June through mid August can climb as high as 80 degrees or fail to make it above 50 degrees. In late August through September, precipitation increases and temperatures are cooler, with highs in the 40s and 50s and nighttime lows potentially below freezing. We recommend plenty of synthetic or wool layers underneath rain gear in order to stay dry and comfortable.

Insects:

What Alaska’s summer lacks in length it makes up for in intensity where insects are concerned.  From June through August, mosquitoes, black flies, and a variety of no-see-ums fill the air, looking for opportunities to feed. We recommend long sleeves, bug netting, and bug spray in order to keep them at bay.

Wildlife:

Wildlife viewing is one of the many reasons that people visit Alaska, and with good reason. Alaska is home to an array of wildlife, from fish and birds to some of the largest land mammals in North America. Sightings are impossible to predict, but fortunately, rivers are great wildlife corridors! From weasels and river otters to moose and bears, a remote float trip offers opportunities for an unforgettable encounter. Bring binoculars and a camera!

A note on bears: If you are traveling in the backcountry in Alaska (or in Anchorage for that matter), you are traveling in bear country. Depending on the time and place, brown bears, interior grizzlies, and black bears may be encountered. Traveling in bear country requires some caution and common sense, but it is important to remember that bears aren’t lurking behind every bush and hill. By selecting a campsite with care, keeping a scrupulously clean camp, and traversing respectfully and alertly through the backcountry, we work hard to ensure that wildlife encounters are safe for our guests as well as the animals.

Communications:

Our remote floats give you an opportunity to enjoy great fishing and incredible scenery, but just as important, you’ll be able to completely unplug while you are on the water. Depending on your carrier, you may get cell phone service in Bethel or other bush communities, but once we hit the river, you will be out of range. We highly encourage you to leave your devices behind (except for a camera!) and let your trip be the sole focus of your attention. Rest assured, in the interest of safety we carry a satellite phone along on all trips in case of emergency.

Food:

You are going to eat very well around our campfire. Simple, hearty, and delicious meals will keep you satisfied and energized throughout the trip. At meal time, we do the cooking while you relax in camp or make a few more casts. We also have snacks available anytime you need an energy boost. Although we cannot accommodate all dietary restrictions or requests, if you let us know of any restrictions or requests in advance, then we will do our best to plan our menus with those in mind.

Beverages:

We offer coffee and tea in the morning and plenty of filtered water throughout the day, but we do not provide soft drinks or alcoholic beverages on our float trips. However, you are more than welcome to bring whatever beverages you like along on your trip. The biggest consideration is weight, so please coordinate with us regarding beverages in advance of your trip so that we can help with planning, including ensuring we do not exceed the weight capacity available on the float plane flight.